Customer Security Awareness Program

OUR COMMITMENT TO SECURITY

The Casey County Bank and its employees are committed to maintaining the confidentiality of your personal information; our staff is constantly training on new and existing threats to customer and information security. We take a multi-layered approach to internal security and our online banking system employs many security measures such as multi-factor authentication and 256 bit encryption to secure the connection between your computer and our online banking system.

The Casey County Bank will never contact you and ask for your personal banking details – like social security numbers, accounts numbers, PIN, and online banking login details. If you want to report suspicious phone calls, emails, links, websites, have any questions regarding this program, or any questions regarding the security of your information please feel free to contact us at 606-787-8394.

The following is information from The Casey County Bank and The Federal Trade Commission on protecting yourself online, for more information about how to protect your security visit OnGuardOnline.gov or Consumer.ftc.gov

USE SECURITY SOFTWARE THAT UPDATES AUTOMATICALLY

The bad guys constantly develop new ways to attack your computer, so your security software must be up-to-date to protect against the latest threats. Most security software can update automatically; set yours to do so. You can find free security software from well-known companies. Also, set your operating system and web browser to update automatically.

If you let your operating system, web browser, or security software get out-of-date, criminals could sneak their bad programs — malware — onto your computer and use it to secretly break into other computers, send spam, or spy on your online activities. There are steps you can take to detect and get rid of malware.

Don’t buy security software in response to unexpected pop-up messages or emails, especially messages that claim to have scanned your computer and found malware. Scammers send messages like these to try to get you to buy worthless software, or worse, to “break and enter” your computer.

TREAT YOUR PERSONAL INFORMATION LIKE CASH

Don’t hand it out to just anyone. Your Social Security number, credit card numbers, and bank and utility account numbers can be used to steal your money or open new accounts in your name. So every time you are asked for your personal information — whether in a web form, an email, a text, or a phone message — think about whether you can really trust the request. In an effort to steal your information, scammers will do everything they can to appear trustworthy.

CHECK OUT COMPANIES TO FIND OUT WHO YOU’RE REALLY DEALING WITH

When you’re online, a little research can save you a lot of money. If you see an ad or an offer that looks good to you, take a moment to check out the company behind it. Type the company or product name into your favorite search engine with terms like “review,” “complaint,” or “scam.” If you find bad reviews, you’ll have to decide if the offer is worth the risk. If you can’t find contact information for the company, take your business elsewhere.

Don’t assume that an ad you see on a reputable site is trustworthy. The fact that a site features an ad for another site doesn’t mean that it endorses the advertised site, or is even familiar with it.

GIVE PERSONAL INFORMATION OVER ENCRYPTED WEBSITES ONLY

If you’re shopping or banking online, stick to sites that use encryption to protect your information as it travels from your computer to their server. To determine if a website is encrypted, look for https at the beginning of the web address (the “s” is for secure).

Some websites use encryption only on the sign-in page, but if any part of your session isn’t encrypted, the entire account could be vulnerable. Look for https on every page of the site you’re on, not just where you sign in.

PROTECT YOUR PASSWORDS

Here are a few principles for creating strong passwords and keeping them safe:

  • The longer the password, the tougher it is to crack. Use at least 10 characters; 12 is ideal for most home users.
  • Mix letters, numbers, and special characters. Try to be unpredictable — don’t use your name, birthdate, or common words.
  • Don’t use the same password for many accounts. If it’s stolen from you — or from one of the companies with which you do business — it can be used to take over all your accounts.
  • Don’t share passwords on the phone, in texts or by email. Legitimate companies will not send you messages asking for your password. If you get such a message, it’s probably a scam.
  • Keep your passwords in a secure place, out of plain sight.

BACK UP YOUR FILES

No system is completely secure. Copy important files onto a removable disc or an external hard drive, and store it in a safe place. If your computer is compromised, you’ll still have access to your files.

IDENTITY THEFT

Identity theft is a crime in which an imposter obtains key pieces of personal information, such as Social Security or driver’s license numbers, in order to impersonate someone else. The information can be used to obtain credit, merchandise, and services in the name of the victim, or to provide the thief with false credentials. In addition to running up debt, an imposter might provide false identification to police, creating a criminal record or leaving outstanding arrest warrants for the person whose identity has been stolen.

WHAT DO THIEVES DO WITH YOUR INFORMATION?

Once identity thieves have your personal information, they can drain your bank account, run up charges on your credit cards, open new utility accounts, or get medical treatment on your health insurance. An identity thief can file a tax refund in your name and get your refund. In some extreme cases, a thief might even give your name to the police during an arrest.

CLUES THAT SOMEONE HAS STOLEN YOUR INFORMATION

  • You see withdrawals from your bank account that you can’t explain.
  • You don’t get your bills or other mail.
  • Merchants refuse your checks.
  • Debt collectors call you about debts that aren’t yours.
  • You find unfamiliar accounts or charges on your credit report.
  • Medical providers bill you for services you didn’t use.
  • Your health plan rejects your legitimate medical claim because the records show you’ve reached your benefits limit.
  • A health plan won’t cover you because your medical records show a condition you don’t have.
  • The IRS notifies you that more than one tax return was filed in your name, or that you have income from an employer you don’t work for.
  • You get notice that your information was compromised by a data breach at a company where you do business or have an account.

If your wallet, Social Security number, or other personal information is lost or stolen, there are steps you can take to help protect yourself from identity theft.

If you believe you are a victim of identity theft use the link below for a checklist from the Federal Trade Commission about the steps you should take or visit IdentityTheft.gov.

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR FOR ASSISTANCE WITH IDENTIFY THEFT PLEASE VISIT THE WEBSITES BELOW:

"Beware of little expenses; a small leak will sink a great ship."
- Benjamin Franklin

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